The National Hispanic Media Coalition (NHMC) recognized FUSION’s documentary ‘Hate Rising’ with an Impact Award for Outstanding Documentary at its annual Oscars-week gala on Friday evening. ‘Hate Rising’ was reported by award-winning news anchor Jorge Ramos, directed by Catherine Tambini and produced in conjunction with Story House Entertainment.

“Though the Oscars this year once again fail to recognize the tremendous Latino talent in entertainment today, NHMC’s Impact Awards Gala seeks to give these creatives the accolades they deserve and excite a new generation of young people,” said Alex Nogales, president and CEO of the NHMC. “Latinos represent 18 percent of the population and the biggest group of moviegoers in the country. Our community deserves more from film studios, a fair shot to increase the positive portrayals of Latinos across America like all of our honorees are striving to do.”

‘Hate Rising’ director accepting the Impact Award on Friday, February 24, 2017.

Hate Rising producer Catherine Tambini accepted the award on behalf of the production team. “One of the main reasons that I make documentaries are to hopefully have an impact on society so to receive this honor for doing what I love to do, it doesn’t get any better than that,” Tambini said. “Martin Luther King Jr. said that the arc of the moral universe is long but bends toward justice. Right now it feels to me that it’s warping in the other direction. That’s why it’s important for us, the filmmakers, the journalists, the media, to keep looking for the truth and demanding that it be told. We must tell the stories that may be hard to hear, hold a mirror up to the country. We must be strong, we must be vigilant, we must speak truth to power unafraid of the consequences.”

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‘Hate Rising’ shined a light on the astonishing and very concerning rise of hate in America — examining the small, radical segment of the non-Hispanic population who feels threatened by the demographic changes in the country and are resisting the possibility of becoming a minority. The country is increasingly seeing ideas, usually confined to private and secretive gatherings, becoming mainstream thanks, in part, to some of the rhetoric that was used during the recent election cycle. Throughout the timely film, Ramos explores the mainstreaming of these ideas on TV, social media, and in our communities and classrooms. Over four months Ramos traveled to small towns across the nation speaking with Neo Nazis, members of the KKK and the Alt-Right. He also heard stories of Muslims and Latinos who have been the victims of hate crimes. Ramos himself, a Mexican immigrant who is also an American citizen, experienced the anger and intolerance simmering just beneath the surface of our society when a Trump supporter told him to “get out of my country” at a campaign event in Iowa.

Watch the documentary below.